Last edited by JoJozil
Saturday, May 2, 2020 | History

3 edition of Using a microcomputer in the classroom found in the catalog.

Using a microcomputer in the classroom

Gary G. Bitter

Using a microcomputer in the classroom

by Gary G. Bitter

  • 351 Want to read
  • 7 Currently reading

Published by Prentice-Hall in Englewood Cliffs, N.J .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Computer-assisted instruction.,
  • Microcomputers.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementGary G. Bitter, Ruth A. Camuse.
    ContributionsCamuse, Ruth A.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsLB1028.5 .B47 1988
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxvi, 348 p. :
    Number of Pages348
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL2385422M
    ISBN 100139389784
    LC Control Number87014337

      Topics discussed will include a student history file used to generate information regarding the student population, a method for storing and retrieving student scores on the Stanford Achievement Test, and an example of how spelling vocabulary may be reinforced by using a . Welcome to the first critical guide to microcomputer "bookware." This book evaluates a representative cross-section of the microcomputer titles which currently compete for your time and money. The individual reviews treat each book's content and quality of presentation, in most.

    The book contains 22 chapters and 2 appendices. Prior to using this book, users should have some familiarity with statistics, accounting, and marketing. They should also be comfortable with using computers, particularly spreadsheets, and have some knowledge of the Internet. The following is a summary of the topics covered in this : $ Below is a detailed list of pros and cons of using a computer in the classroom. PROS OF USING COMPUTERS IN CLASSROOMS. Encourages peer to peer learning: Teachers can insist students create virtual study groups using computers to share or ask academic information. With the many social applications available, it is very easy to connect students.

    Thornton R.K. () Using Large-Scale Classroom Research to Study Student Conceptual Learning in Mechanics and to Develop New Approaches to Learning. In: Tinker R.F. (eds) Microcomputer–Based Labs: Educational Research and by: one student per microcomputer while the teaching assistant administered the same examination in a classroom using conventional test booklets and optical scan final test consisted of 35 multiple-choice i tems. The testing and grading software used by the experimental group was available from a commercial vendor. This package presented.


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Using a microcomputer in the classroom by Gary G. Bitter Download PDF EPUB FB2

ISBN: OCLC Number: Description: xiii, pages: illustrations ; 24 cm: Contents: Technological literacy --The microcomputer --Computer applications --Computer-assisted instruction --The computer as a tool for teachers and students --Choosing appropriate software --Choosing the right hardware for your classroom --The microcomputer classroom --Putting it all.

This book was written to help classroom teachers, lay persons, and school personnel understand the role of microcomputers in education. It has been especially designed for undergraduate and graduate technology-based education programs. Specific education examples and applications are provided throughout the book and exercises have been designed for students to further explore specific Author: Gary G.

Bitter. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Bitter, Gary G. Using a microcomputer in the classroom. Reston, Va.: Reston Pub. Co., © (OCoLC) Description.

The main emphasis of this book is on classroom and curricular integration, not on computer technology. Its curriculum-based approach to using microcomputers addresses the needs and concerns of preservice and inservice teachers of different experiential backgrounds, from computer novice through long-time proficient users.

Comput. Educ. Vol. 8, N o. 1, pp.Printed in Great Britain /84 $ + Pergamon Press Ltd THE F U T U R E OF THE MICROCOMPUTER AS A CLASSROOM TEACHING AID: A N EMPIRICAL APPROACH TO CRYSTAL GAZING RICHARD J. PHILLIPS, H U G H BURKHARDT, JON C O U P L A N D, ROSEMARY F R A S E R and JIM R I D G W A Y * 1 1 1 2 12 Cited by: 7.

Reviews and Testimonials "[Using Technology with Classroom Instruction That Works 2nd Edition] is a 'big-picture' book that surveys the field of technological tools and helps the teacher connect with the kinds of technology she might wish to use in the ors in the classroom up to district leaders, who are interested in what kinds of tools teachers and students can use with.

Using Technology in the Classroom highlights the essential topics related to using technology in education, as outlined in the ISTE (NETS-S and NETS-T)standards.

The book covers all the relevant technology topics related to understanding, creating, developing, applying and implementing technology rich experiences for students and by: Microcomputers In Education.

by Pierre P. Barrette Assistant Professor Information Science Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Media College of Education Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Illinois This article includes excerpts from: The Microcomputer and the School Library Media Specialist.

PDF | On Jan 1,Jeffrey A Hart and others published Using Microcomputer Simulations in the Classroom: Examples from Undergraduate and Faculty Computer Literacy Courses | Find, read Author: Jeffrey A Hart. This appendix discusses the background and uses of microcomputer desktop simulators. In this appendix, a basic microcomputer desktop simulator consists of a microcomputer with hard drive, a single cathode ray tube color monitor, keyboard, an auxiliary control device such as a mouse or trackball, data input-output capabilities, and simulation software.

Intended for special educators,-the book is designed to provide information for assessing classroom needs, making decisions about purchasing software and hardware, and using the microcomputer effectively.

Each chapter begins with statements to, think about and a. Quizlet is a lightning fast way to learn vocabulary.

Log in Sign up. 1 set 1 member Thomas Nelson Community College Hampton, VA. ITE Introduction To Microcomputer Application and concept. 1 set 1 member Ivy Tech Community College Muncie, IN. Introduction to Microcomputers.

The authors advance a preliminary definition of successful microcomputer use that focuses on how teachers integrate microcomputers with their ongoing instruction. Potential means of integration are discussed, including teachers' instructional goals, ongoing curriculum, computer-based learning activities, appropriateness of integration, and Cited by: 1.

Cornput. Educ. Vol. 8, No. 1, pp./ + Printed in Great Britain Pergamon Press Ltd THE FUTURE OF THE MICROCOMPUTER AS A CLASSROOM TEACHING AID: AN EMPIRICAL APPROACH TO CRYSTAL GAZING RICHARD J. PHILLIPS1, HUGH BURKHARDTl, JON COUPLAND2, ROSEMARY FRASER1'2 and JIM RIDGWAY1'* The ITMA Collaboration 1Shell Cited by: 7.

"The audience that will most benefit from this book are classroom teachers who are beginners in using technology. The resources and tools Ivers discusses, however, will be of interest to more tech-savvy teachers as well." - VOYA "This is a must-have book for every library professionalCited by: To encourage teachers to share ideas and suggestions for integrating technology into the classroom, Using Technology in the Classroom shows you how to change the way administrators, teachers, parents, and students think about the teaching and learning process.

As this important book shows, technology can allow you to make the transition from teacher-directed learning to learner-centered Reviews: 1.

Looking for books by Gary G. Bitter. See all books authored by Gary G. Bitter, including Using Technology in the Classroom, Brief Edition, and Mathematics Methods for Elementary and Middle School Teachers, and more on Of course, it is important to understand the capabilities that computer hardware and software offer for language instruction.

However, the key to using the microcomputer wisely is to consider it in relation to teachers' and students' goals and needs. Microcomputer-based labs, the use of real-time data capture and display in teaching, give the learner new ways to explore and understand the world.

As this book shows, the international effort over a quarter-century to develop and understand microcomputer-based labs (MBL) has resulted in a rich array of innovative implementations and some.

Findings indicate that: (1) U.S. schools are now usingmicrocomputers, a 75% increase over the school year; (2) public school use of micros (%) still exceeds private (%. %0 Book Section %A Thornton, Ronald %D October 1, %T Using Large-Scale Classroom Research to Study Student Conceptual Learning in Mechanics and to Develop New Approaches to Learning %E Tinker, Robert F.

%B Microcomputer-Based Labs: Educational Research and Standards %V %P %8 October 1, %@ X.The study incorporated the use of a portable microcomputer in the classroom to allow the child to initiate communication from the very onset of instruction.

Traditionally, children using computers have been instructed to respond to statements and questions and their responses have been required to fall within a small range of acceptable answers.the microcomputer. But despite its power and interactive capabilities, the computer remains a tool fully exploited by relatively few.

Becker () found that over 60% of teachers surveyed in did not use a computer at all. He also found, though, that the number of teachers using computers doubled from to .